Time Out

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From outdoor art markets such as Port Vell Art Market to architectural classics such as Antoni Gaudí’s Sagrada Familia, this city is a veritable feast for the eyes.

1. Jardines de les tres Xemeneies (Garden of the Three Chimneys)

Located in the former grounds of the Barcelona Traction, Light and Power Company Ltd., this urban park is an unmissable attraction for lovers of street art. Its walls are filled with vibrant political and social commentaries, which can be enjoyed as skaters whizz past you and local dance crews practise their routines.

View of the Three Chimneys
View of the Three Chimneys
View of the Three Chimneys
View of the Three Chimneys

2. Casa Batlló

This townhouse on Passeig de Gràcia in the barrio of Eixample bears testament to Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí’s fascination with nature. With a reptilian roof, skeletal elements and an overarching preference for curved rather than straight lines, this house feels like a living, breathing work of art. 

Casa Batllo
Casa Batllo
Casa Batllo
Casa Batllo

3. Museu de l’Art Prohibit (Museum of Forbidden Art)

Also in Eixample, this place is a haven for censored art. Located in the Casa Garriga Nogués, a townhouse built in 1901 by prolific Barcelona architect Enric Sagnier, visitors will enjoy the elegant setting as much as the collection of controversial artwork, which includes pieces by the likes of Banksy, Gustav Klimt, Franciso de Goya and Pablo Picasso.

 

If you happen to be in the vibey Eixample on a Saturday, between gallery hopping, make sure you take a peek at the farmer’s market that takes place on Consell de Cent.

Museu de l'Art Prohibit
Museu de l'Art Prohibit
Museu de l'Art Prohibit
Museu de l'Art Prohibit

4. Museu Picasso

Speaking of Picasso, we’d be remiss not to include one of Spain’s most famous artists in our list. Although Picasso was born in Malaga, his family moved to Barcelona in 1896, making the city the backdrop to his formative years as an artist. This collection is housed in five mansions in the barrio of El Born and includes over 4200 works by the artist.

Museu Picasso
Museu Picasso
Museu Picasso
Museu Picasso

5. Museo Moco

While you’re in El Born, pay a visit to Museo Moco, which you’ll find in Palacio Cervelló, an impressive sixteenth-century aristocratic residence. Home to a range of interactive, digital, modern and contemporary art, this museum has everything from works by greats such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Damien Hirst to a giant hybrid Smurf-Mickey Mouse sculpture (Final Days by Kaws).

Museo Moco
Museo Moco
Museo Moco
Museo Moco

6. Girona and the Dalí Museum

Just outside Barcelona, in Salvador Dalí’s hometown of Figueres, lies the fabulous Dalí Museum. Based around a former theatre in Figueres, the museum is an opportunity to take in some of the artist’s most towering creations, curated by the man himself, who famously stated that he wanted visitors to feel like they had ‘had a theatrical dream’. If that’s not fascinating enough, this shore experience also gives culture vultures the chance to visit nearby medieval Girona.

Dalí Museum
Dalí Museum
Dalí Museum
Dalí Museum

Feeling inspired?

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